TestBash 3: How to Talk to a CIO About Software Testing (If You Really Have to…) – Keith Klain

TestBash 3: How to Talk to a CIO About Software Testing (If You Really Have to…) – Keith Klain from Software Testing Club on Vimeo.

The question I get asked more than any other than “How did you get our job”, is “How do you talk to your CIO about software testing”. As software testers are typically not in positions of authority in organisations, this question seems natural, but more important is to find out why aren’t there more testers in management positions. Why do CIOs and senior IT management put people with non-testing backgrounds in charge of such an important function? Through this talk, I will attempt to answer those questions through profiles of CIOs I have worked with and the approach I have taken to tell the testing story, as well, I will offer my opinion why more testers aren’t in management positions and what we can do about it. So put your bias aside and join me as we take a hard look at what’s working (and what’s not working) in software testing management, the culture of skilled testing, how to join the ranks of management without losing your soul.

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One Response to “TestBash 3: How to Talk to a CIO About Software Testing (If You Really Have to…) – Keith Klain”

  1. Jim HazenMay 12, 2014 at 3:49 pm #

    Excellent talk. It all boils down to knowing who your target audience is and “speaking” in their “language”. It is about learning to push yourself to go and “talk with” those people and explain how it (testing) can impact them. Find out what their motivations and concerns are, and then explain how testing can help them in those respects. For most C-level people it is about money; how much will they make, how much it will cost to make that money and how best to guard against issues that will impact making that money. Some of these are hard dollar impacts such as development and support costs. Some are soft dollar impacts such as reputation of company & product, perceived ‘quality’ of the product, new sales and renewal opportunities (gained and lost) revenues.

    As Keith said, it comes down to reducing the ‘suck’ factor and communicating clearly.