Introduction to Java - Mike Talks

About This Course

Many testers want to know more about programming, but it’s difficult to know where to begin. You’ve probably heard of Java, it’s one of the most popular languages for building automation frameworks in Selenium and a great place to start your journey into writing automation code to support testing.

This is an introductory Java course for software testers that will guide you through the basics of programming in Java. We’ll take you through the features of the language, starting with the obligatory “Hello World” program. We’ll talk about variables, loops and ifs before getting into being able to create classes.

Lessons will take you through step-by-step on how to code each concept, and we’ll be showing a little of the common “gotchas” to avoid. You’ll be shown authentic, follow-along programming examples and have practical exercises to put your skills into practice.

What You'll Learn:

By the end of this course, you’ll be able to:

  • Understand the basic grammar rules of Java
  • Declare and use different variable types
  • Create methods which can pass and return data
  • Create Ifs for conditional logic
  • Create Loops for repeating yourself
  • Bring in other Java packages to build on what’s available out there
  • Use JUnit to create tests for your code
  • Throw and handle exceptions when something has gone wrong

 

Who's This Course For:

Software testers looking to learn Java for the first time. Very little programming skills are assumed. People who want to roll up their sleeves and have a go, and are capable to install the required software.

Prerequisites:

To successfully complete this course you will need:

  • Basic knowledge of programming principles

Resources you will use throughout this course:

Meet the Instructor

Mike Talks

Mike Talks

Mike Talks works as a test manager around Wellington. He loves strategy in all shapes and sizes, having helped to deliver all shapes and size of project. However, challenge him to a game of chess, and he might need clarification of "how does the horsey move again?".

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