We’re super excited to announce another excellent line-up for this year’s TestBash Manchester, now online!

And to make things even better we’re building the excitement throughout the week by offering you the chance to see one talk a day, starting on Monday, the 28th of September, leading up to the conference day on Friday, the 2nd of October where we’ll have the very enthusiastic Leigh Rathbone joining us as host to make sure we bring you the most Mancunian TestBash experience possible.

Do you have credit with Ministry of Testing and would like to use it to purchase your Pro Membership to attend TestBash Manchester? Get in touch with us on manchester@ministryoftesting.com with your previous booking details and we'll make it happen.

Schedule

Monday, 28th of September

01:00 PM
Getting Started with Mobile Accessibility Testing - Ady Stokes

Tuesday, 29th of September

01:00 PM
Don't Run Before You Can Walk - Louise Gibbs

Wednesday, 30th of September

01:00 PM
What is a Principal Tester? - Jitesh Gosai

Thursday, 1st of October

06:00 PM
My Journey to Becoming a DevOps Tester... By Playing Board Games - Hannah Beech
06:40 PM
How to Build Your Personal Brand - Gabbi Trotter

Friday, 2nd of October

09:25 AM
Discover data science testing - Laveena Ramchandani
10:05 AM
How to coach subject matter experts to do testing - Jesper Ottosen
11:40 AM
The Average Tester: Succeeding Because You Are Not A Rockstar - Beth Marshall
12:20 PM
What You Looking At? Modern Art and Testing in the Blink of an Eye - John McGee
02:05 PM
Thinking Outside the Box: Cognitive Bias and Testing - Lisa Crispin
02:45 PM
How to find your way in the automation framework jungle - Wim Selles
04:15 PM
Panel Discussion: Management in Testing - Taheerah Atchia, Chris Thacker & Mohamed Mulla
*The presented times are in UK Timezone (UTC+1)

Registration

Pro Membership is required to register for TestBash Manchester Online 2020.

TestBash online events are now part of Pro membership, making it really simple and affordable to attend all our online events. Sign Up now for £24.99 a month or save with our yearly/team subscriptions.

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Speakers

Ady Stokes

Ady Stokes

Test Engineer

Louise Gibbs

Louise Gibbs

Jitesh Gosai

Jitesh Gosai

Principal Tester

Hannah Beech

Hannah Beech

Principal Test Engineer

Gabbi Trotter

Gabbi Trotter

Software Testing Recruiter

Laveena Ramchandani

Laveena Ramchandani

Senior Consultant

Jesper Ottosen

Jesper Ottosen

Senior Test Manager

Beth Marshall

Beth Marshall

Senior Test Lead

John McGee

John McGee

Senior Test Engineer

Lisa Crispin

Lisa Crispin

Quality consultant

Wim Selles

Wim Selles

Sr. Solutions Architect

Taheerah Atchia

Taheerah Atchia

Head of Quality Advocacy

Chris Thacker

Chris Thacker

Head of Engineering

Mohamed Mulla

Mohamed Mulla

QA Manager

Is your company looking to raise awareness of your testing products or services? Or perhaps they are currently hiring? If so, checkout our sponsorship options to see how TestBash Manchester Online 2020 could help you.
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Sessions

I’ve been an accessibility advocate for some time focusing on web testing. Accessibility is really important but particularly in mobile devices as a recent survey showed 96.9%, of users who responded indicated owning or using a wireless device such as a traditional smartphone. I had limited opportunities to really get into mobile accessibility testing and what I had done was more from an exploration perspective rather than actual testing. 
 
A recent job change has allowed me to really start looking into mobile testing and the similarities and differences to web accessibility. From understanding how to get an app from the codebase to the phone to be able to actually test. To getting to grips with all the different hand gestures on both iOS and Android it is a fascinating subject. 
 
Through this session, I hope to cover some of the questions I struggled to answer before it became my job to do this daily. I’ll explain why it is so important that you turn on shortcuts first, before beginning to test. I’ll show accessibility mode on my phone and show what a different experience this is. I’ll explain some of the gestures that are used and why cheat sheets are so valuable. I’ll talk about and show some of the tools you can use to support your testing efforts. 
 

Takeaways

After this session attendees will understand the similarities and differences between web and mobile accessibility testing. 
They will have seen a phone being used in accessibility mode and how different this is. 
They will have tips to help them begin learning mobile accessibility. 
They will see mobile accessibility tools in action. 
 
Ady Stokes
A long-time accessibility advocate with over 20 years of direct auditing, coaching, leadership, training and testing experience. Passionate about quality, accessibility, delivering value, sharing knowledge, the test community and ideas. Creator of the Periodic Table of Testing, Accessibility Quadrants, presenter at international conferences, TestBash speaker and organiser of Ministry of Testing Leeds Meetup
@Cricketrulz
https://www.thebigtesttheory.com/
In May 2010, I broke both of my legs in a rock climbing accident. Fortunately, the damage was not so severe that I could not walk again. However, it took many years of operations, strength training and physio-therapy before I was walking normally again. I would not have achieved this without the help and support of friends, family, doctors, nurses and physiotherapists. It is important to note that I didn't stop at walking. I continued my training to maintain and improve my physical fitness so I could run again. 
 
A similar experience will apply to career development. Many testers want to become test automation developers but lack the skills, experience and opportunity to do so.  We need to start small, and slowly develop the skills required to become a test automation developer. We don't stop once we've achieved this goal. We continue our development to improve our skills and keep up to date with emerging technologies. To be successful, we need support and opportunity provided by the teams and companies we work for. 
 
During this talk, I will discuss the skills required to become test automation developers. However, this is not ONLY a talk for testers new to test automation. It is also for experienced developers wanting to guide and encourage testers to gain confidence so they will give test automation a go. 

Takeaways

 - Identify the requirements for getting started with test automation
 - Identify activities that can help testers get started on their journey to becoming test automation developers
 - Identify ways that the business and team can support testers who want to get involved in test automation
Louise Gibbs
Louise recently started work as a Senior QA Analyst at MandM Direct, an online sportswear retailer. Before this, she worked at Malvern Panalytical, a company that developed scientific instruments for a variety of industries, most notably pharmaceuticals. She was involved in testing the software used to carry out automated particle imaging and raman spectroscopy to identify particles in a mixed sample. Louise graduated from Bangor University with a degree in Computer Science for Business. Her first job after university was as a software tester for Loyalty Logistix, a company that produced Web, Mobile and Desktop applications that allowed members of the Automotive industry to run Loyalty schemes for customers.
@Louise_J_Gibbs
https://louisegibbstest.wordpress.com/
A question I get asked a lot is “What is a Principal Tester?” This is all the more common since I became one back in early 2019. I think the reason behind the questions is because it is unlike other roles where the definition of them is in the title itself. For example Test Manager, Test Lead, Senior Tester or Junior Tester all hint at what they are likely to do and tend to fit into a hierarchical structure in your head. But a Principal Tester doesn't invoke such an image. Are they a Senior Tester but more so like a Super Senior Tester? Do they have more responsibility than a Test Lead but less than a Test Manager? 
 
In this talk I’d like to address what a Principal Tester is, why we need them in our organisations and why you might want to consider it as a career path. 
 
What is a Principal Tester? I’ll detail two models; The Expert and The Quality Engineer I’ll go into what both are; the types of situations they are best suited to tackle; benefits they bring and how organisations can and should have both. As well as the positives, I’ll also highlight some of the potential downsides you need to be aware of. 
 
The Expert is a Principal Tester you can throw at any situation and knows just what to do through their breadth and depth of experience while The Quality Engineer is all about creating  a quality culture within your departments and teams.  
 
Why do we need Principal Testers? As teams and organisations grow the needs of your testers and teams can be neglected. Needs such as their foundational agile knowledge, problems solving skills and developing their ability to continuously learn. Not only do these skills need to be developed but in a way that allows for them to assert their autonomy while still being in alignment with others but also being accountable for their actions. 
 
This is where the Principal Tester model can provide the right support for the right problems. The Expert for issues that need addressing immediately and The Quality Engineer for supporting Tester and Test Lead roles. They can do this through coaching their Test leads to build the autonomy and accountability they and their testers need to do their best work. All while collaborating with their counterparts throughout the organisation to develop company wide alignment and knowledge sharing.  

Why become a Principal Tester? The Principal Tester role opens up another avenue for testers to explore if the typical management path for career development isn’t your calling. It brings you into a leadership role where you can hone your test craftsmanship skills as well as developing new skills to compliment the work of the Test Leads and Managers. The added benefit of this role is that you can shape it to best meet yours and your teams’ requirements. 
 

Takeaways

  • The Expert and The Quality Engineer model of what a Principal Tester is
    • Why is it different to a other Senior Test Positions 
  • What they bring to your department that a embedded tester doesn’t 
  • Why you might want to consider it as a career path 
 
Jitesh Gosai
Over the course of the last 15 years as a Test professional I've strived to help the teams I've worked with be the best they can. I've seen first hand what does and doesn't work in improving quality of our products across the software industry. I now want to take these experiences and help others make their teams be the best they can by improving quality through testability.
@jitgo
http://jitgo.uk/blog
In this talk, I will describe my journey to becoming more involved with DevOps by building and releasing APIs to track playing board games. 

As a tester, I found myself wondering if I'd ever have enough technical knowledge to keep up with the developers in my team. I was also having difficultly keeping track and statistics on what board games I'd been playing. One day, I realised the perfect solution to both these problems - build an API that talked to a Google Sheet, and ran various analysis on the data, using AWS SAM.

But what then? I needed somewhere to host this data. So I set up a pipeline using Jenkins and Docker to release the output of this data to my website. Throughout this process, and many, many failures with my set-up of AWS, Docker and Jenkins, I learnt so much and become so more confident in my knowledge. Finally my goal of holding my own with talking to developers was well on the way to being complete.

As well as the technical knowledge I am constantly gaining with this, an important lesson I've learnt is how much easier it can be to learn new things when you incorporate a hobby into your learning.

With this talk, I'd like to share this journey with the TestBash Manchester audience, and hopefully inspire other testers in their journey of DevOps. 

Takeaways

- How to get started with DevOps, from a Tester's perspective
- Improving your self-esteem & confidence in your own knowledge
- Learning how software engineering/testing is far more than just writing code
Hannah Beech
I'm a Principal Test Engineer working in a DevOps team at Footasylum. I've proudly say "I'm a tester who doesn't test. It's not my job to test. It's my job to coach my team how to test" multiple times. When I'm not coaching my team on testing best practices, I'm either playing boardgames, talking about boardgames, or trying to stop my cats from breaking boardgames.
@hannardynamite

It is fair to say 2020 has been a crazy one. With so much uncertainty in the job market and competition to secure the roles that are available, it couldn’t be a more important time to harness the power of having a Personal Brand.

During this talk, I will be covering a myriad of topics that span branding and utilising social media in your job search. I will take you through step by step to understand what a personal brand is, how to put it together and why it is of such great value in 2020. As well as this I will be pulling on my 5 years’ experience as a “Social Media” enthusiast to show you how to secure a role via social media, and how you can best build meaningful online networks.

Takeaways

How to identify your personal brand.

Using social media to help you find a new role + grow your network.

How to use Content to boost your online presence.

Gabbi Trotter
I am a Software Testing Recruiter with 5 years of experience recruiting Testers. I work with Global Brands and small independent Software Houses and everything in between! I have involved myself in the Test Community from day one and made some great friends!
@Gabbibility
https://twitter.com/Gabbibility
I would like to share my knowledge about testing a model in a data science team. I appreciate this is a new area for testers to be in, but it has been a great experience to learn from. 
 
Giveaways:
I’d like to share how I explored the world of data science as a tester when testing a model and how we can apply that if we find ourselves in this situation. As part of an emerging team, how I contributed value in a field I have never tested.
 
I have heard from other senior testers that they know of data science teams but no testers testing the models, how do we have enough confidence what is produced is good enough? A model is a statistical black box, how to test it so we understand its behaviours to test is properly.  Main aim would be to help inspire testers to explore data science models. 
 
I’d like to invite you to my talk where, we will go through my journey of discovering data science model testing and find the following takeaways useful not just for testing a data science model but day to day testing too. 
 
1 - Some background of what a data science model is, and how data plays a role in these models. Understand from vast amounts of data. 
            -structured data 
            -unstructured data
            -metadata
            -semi-structured data
2 - Understand data pipelines 
 
3 - Importance of pairing -Follow a SDLC process which may require a bit more of exploratory testing and investigation, therefore pairing with data scientist is a good way of working and understanding the model
 
4 - Pre-testing thoughts: is the model custom made/ off the shelf? 
How as a team are, we training our own model to behave? 
What is my input and what’s my output? 
Am I experiencing the right behaviour? (models do contain some element of randomness so how we will make sure what’s acceptable when testing the results?)
 
5 - As testers, we expect input + model that uses predictive analytics  = output example 5+3 = 8 but for data scientists  5+3= 8 is not always 8 but  8.1,.8.001,.8.5 in simple words stochastic, so how will we bring processes and strategies to make sure we capture the right output results and the consumers still benefit from this? In a nutshell, making sure the model’s quality is good and we have the confidence in what we provide to consumers.
 
6 - Test the areas we are certain about the behaviour and those areas uncertain about have some bounds around averages - expectations set
 
7 - Exploratory testing and looking for edge cases, regression testing to see that new features are not breaking baseline results
 
8 - Understanding what tests to perform: what is an acceptable test for the model? 
Have we found anomalies? (results too off the threshold?)
How do we know what we produced as results is the right result? 
How accurate are my results from the model? 
What is an acceptable deviation? 
 
9 - I will give away tips that helped me and could help testers who want to explore testing models and making sure the quality of a model is providing the team with enough confidence and helping a business  
 
10 - Post testing – Have we got a good understanding of what the model has provided? Are the predictive analytics working as expected? Does the shape of my data look as expected? (testing the outputs will explain if the values are of the right type from the data input stage) 

Takeaways

  1. Have a better understanding of what data science is.
  2. Know how we can test models.
  3. Know what existing skills we already have that we can apply in a data science team.
  4. Leave with resources to help our teams’ better structure itself to have confidence in the data produced.
  5. We'll look at what did or didn't work
Laveena Ramchandani
I am a vibrant, motivated and committed individual. I have been in the testing industry now for over 7 years. It's been a great experience learning and sharing skills. I aim to broaden my knowledge further more. Data science is what I am currently focusing on, and it's very exciting to see all the new things one could learn out of it and merge it with testing. Definitely quite interesting!

https://www.linkedin.com/in/laveena-ramchandani-949b8192/
In the recent years I have been working on projects with no dedicated testers but plenty of testing. The testing has primarily been performed by subject matter experts. This is where it gets interesting, as my role on these projects has been to lead the testing being performed by people that have limited experience in testing. They also have no desire to be testing specialists, after all they are already specialists in their own subjects, however, everyone agrees and insist that the testing needs doing. So how do we ensure that the testing being done is done well? 
 
After having worked on several very different projects, yet still with subject matter experts doing the testing, I have been able to get both the public process clerks and the technology specialists to perform excellent testing. This talk is about the approaches that I have found work well: 
 
  • One of the approaches is for me to prepare the test cases and prepare them only as headlines. Sometimes preparing the tests as open questions helps too. 
  • Another approach is to lead them as if they are doing the project participation voluntarily. They probably are, but still it helps to respect where they are coming from.
 
The lessons though (good and bad) is relevant to many testers in other situations, especially being the only “tester” on the team. The story applies equally to developers and business end users doing most of the testing and you will have them contributing with great testing in no time!

Takeaways

What you will know after the talk:
  • An understanding of how testing looks when done by subject matter experts
  • How to lead a testing activity with an appreciative and motivating style
  • Examples of how teams can do great testing without dedicated testers
Jesper Ottosen
Jesper usually leads testing of all kinds of IT - from application development to implementing commercial standard applications, deploying infrastructure and operational technologies and large transition programs.  Jesper works as a Senior Test Manager at NNIT A/S, an IT services company that provides IT consultancy and IT services to the Danish public sector, Danish companies and international life science customers.
@jlottosen
https://jlottosen.wordpress.com/
Have you ever felt overwhelmed or intimidated by the feats of speakers at events like this?  Do you sometimes feel like the industry is moving much faster than you are, and if you don't have all the technical skills under the sun there won't be a job for you?  
In a relentless pursuit to conquer technical skills, you may be overlooking things you could be doing which may be more effective in securing your next promotion, or your next role elsewhere, or even your role several years from now?

Takeaways

I would describe myself as an average tester, in a good way.  Like most testers, I don’t have developer level coding knowledge(*gasp*), I haven’t written a book (*gulp*), and I spend my time outside of work mostly on raising my family - but this hasn’t stopped me from carving out a career in testing from scratch, getting re-hired and ex-bosses moving somewhere and hiring me again. I am not exceptional, but, critically, I am also not a dick. 

I’d love attendees like me to go away knowing there’s longevity to just being good at your job and being good to work with. We shouldn’t pooh pooh the fact that some people work to pay the bills, and I’d love to encourage those people to believe in themselves more, invest in their non-technical skills (its not who you know its who knows you) and know a long term career is achievable without attaining rockstar status.
Beth Marshall
Beth has been testing since 2008, and currently works as Senior Test Lead at Smoothwall. Based in Leeds, she's passionate about Northern tech, and is a proud member of the Yorkshire software testing community. She is also thrilled to be presenting at this years Testbash Manchester event, having thoroughly enjoyed being an attendee for the last few years.
@Beth_AskHer
https://wordpress.com/home/beththetester.wordpress.com
Join me on a dazzling tour that will change the way you look at testing (and art) forever. While looking at a Jackson Pollock painting in New York it struck me that while I loved the painting I didn’t have a clue about what it or most of the other paintings in the gallery represented. I therefore did what all good testers do and looked for an oracle. Quickly concluding that I couldn’t haul an art professor about to answer all my questions I did the next best thing and bought a book about Modern Art. 
 
 Whilst reading this it quickly struck me how many similarities there where between what we do as testers and how artists paint, think and promote their work.  
 
  • I realised the non-cubist nail in a cubist painting was the same as the long leash heuristic keeping the observer rooted into reality. 
  • I blew my mind with Malevich’s black square and lost endless nights of sleep contemplating it, before coming to understand that oracles are as important in art as they are in testing. 
  • I found out how America’s greatest modern artist was almost dismissed as worthless by the worlds greatest art collector until he came to the attention of someone who’s opinion mattered. 
  • I discovered that the worlds great art movements have manifestos which then led me to think about mission statements and the Agile Manifesto. 
  • I learned artists used focusing and defocusing techniques and linked these to techniques we use when exploring and while working out the steps to reproduce issues.
  • I read about how Cezanne turned the art world on its head by questioning what he saw just as an exploratory tester does
  • I saw how the surrealists painted with ideas feeding off ideas linking this into our exploration. 

 I came across so many connections while reading this book that it’s impossible to list them all here, it gave me a greater understanding of perspectives and how bias impacts artists and testers. I found out that artists use models, tools and heuristics in the same way that we do, how we use questioning techniques and how we simplify complex thoughts. I considered stakeholders in the art and development world, how the familiar can be used as an oracle, how we can overcome fears and obstacles and I found how artists told stories and presented images to their audiences. 
 
 So, come with me on this journey through modern (and some classical) art, we’ll weave some testing into the mix so that you’ll never look at a painting in the same way.

Takeaways

  • I will give you an understanding of how art can be used to improve observational, conservational and descriptive skills and share an exercise that you can run through with your teams. 
  • I will share heuristics that you can use while performing and planning testing, some familiar, some new, all with a unique way to describe and share these with others.
  • I will show how you can use various techniques in your testing in the same way as the modern artists did while painting.· I will tell you how you can depict the results of your tests to allow you to target these to your audience.
  • I will get you to think like Cezanne while testing, how he questioned, how he simplified things and his use of different perspectives.
  • We’ll think about the people whose opinion matters and how we can influence and educate our stakeholders by targeting our messages to the audiences these are intended for. 

 In addition to the comparisons and lessons for testers you will also learn how not all conceptual art is bollocks, Picasso is king (but Cézanne is better), Pollock is no drip, how a urinal changed the course of art and why your 5-year-old really, really couldn't do it. You'll be able to blag your way through any gallery like an expert and a visit to the National Gallery or the Tate will never be the same.
John McGee
I've been involved in the world of quality and testing for almost 30 years with a great passion for people and the sharing of ideas and knowledge. My biggest achievement is developing and running a 'Testing Tales' group that invites internal and external speakers to present sessions to our Internal Test Community with attendees running between 60 and 100 from around the world. Outside of testing I love my two dogs, motorsports, travel and getting out to shows and gigs.
@JonnyWasAGudMan
Finding bugs requires detective work. You look for evidence, you interrogate witnesses - and some of those might not be telling the truth! You need lateral thinking to find your perpetrator. The ability to find new perspectives is just as important in discovery as your team plans new features.

 As testers, we often hear that the capability to think outside the box is an essential skill to have. In fact, this skill is great to have whether or not testing is your specialty. Lateral thinking  permits you to generate new and innovative ideas, to find bugs that nobody could think about, it can also help you find completely new ways to solve problems. 

 We all have unconscious biases that can limit our observational skills and creativity. In this session, we’ll discuss lateral vs. vertical thinking, and explain how our brain’s “wiring” can make thinking outside the box be difficult. 

 This will introduce a few of the most common cognitive biases that can work against us and get in the way of effective testing. Included are some quick exercises to help understand different biases.  You’ll get some guidance on how to help your team compensate for unconscious bias, and  build  up your lateral thinking “muscles”. 

Takeaways

  • Learn about unconscious bias 
  • Learn how bias gets in the way of testing
  • Learn ways a team can work together to compensate for bias
  • Get some ideas to promote lateral thinking
Lisa Crispin

Lisa Crispin is the co-author, with Janet Gregory, of More Agile Testing: Learning Journeys for the Whole Team (2014), Agile Testing: A Practical Guide for Testers and Agile Teams (2009), the LiveLessons Agile Testing Essentials video course, and “The Whole Team Approach to Agile Testing” 3-day training course. She co-authored Extreme Testing (2002) with Tip House. She is a contributor to Experiences of Test Automation by Dorothy Graham and Mark Fewster (Addison-Wesley, 2011), Beautiful Testing (O’Reilly, 2009) and other books. Lisa was voted by her peers as the Most Influential Agile Testing Professional Person at Agile Testing Days in 2012. She enjoys helping people find ways to build more quality into their software products, as well as hands-on testing. Please visit www.lisacrispin.com and www.agiletester.ca for more.

@lisacrispin
https://lisacrispin.com

The automation framework world currently looks like a jungle, each month a new framework is created and shared on GitHub. They all promise the same, better, faster, smarter, but is this really the case? Have you ever thought about selection criteria for selecting a new automation framework?

During this presentation I'm going to share what I have seen being used as selection criteria on how to select an automation framework. I'll discuss them all, like:

  • grab and hope
  • I used this before
  • This is hot
  • It’s made by Facebook, it must be good
  • I have a screw, I certainly can use this hammer to get it into the wood
  • I trust nobody, let’s build a new one
  • But I will also share my experiences when I needed to select an automation framework in the past. I will guide you through a little bit more structured process that might help you select that automation framework that suits the (web) app the best, is the best future proof and opens the way to do proper test automation in your CI/CD pipeline.

    Takeaways

  • Attendees will understand how not to select an automation framework. This is based on what I've seen being used in the market over the last 12 years.
  • Attendees will understand how to properly select an automation framework which is based on understanding the (team) requirements.
  • Wim Selles
    Wim Selles is a Solutions Architect for Sauce Labs based in the Netherlands. During the day, he assists customers with solving automation challenges in their organisation. By night, he practices his passion for front-end test automation with Javascript. He likes to create his own Node.JS modules to help and support automation engineers and is also a contributor to multiple open source projects that involve testing, such as WebdriverIO, Protractor, ng-Apimock and many more. Wim also has extensive experience using Appium for automating Hybrid and (React) Native Apps. He enjoys sharing his automation experience as a speaker at conferences like AppiumConf in London and SeleniunConf India, on his blog and during meetups and webinars.
    @wswebcreation
    http://www.wswebcreation.nl/
    We have invited three influential managers from the North-West to take part in this panel discussion about Management in the North West and share their knowledge and experiences. In this panel, you will be able to ask Taheerah Atchia, Chris Thacker and Mohamed Mulla all the questions you have on this hot topic. The panel discussion will take around 40 minutes where our panellists will try and answer as many questions as they can. So make sure you get your thinking hat on for the questions you’d like the panel to answer.
    Taheerah Atchia
    Taheerah Atchia is a QA advocate with a passion for improvement in Quality processes. She specialises in Agile Testing and in developing teams to realign their methods of working to a more collaborative and productive ethic. Having worked with a few household names that are specialists in their field (moneysupermarket.com, LateRooms.com), Taheerah has honed her capabilities in coaching, mentoring and team leading, as well as more strategic and technical demands associated with testing. Her mission is to develop teams to transform their thinking, approach and capability, resulting in a happier and more efficient workforce.
    @taheerah_atchia
    Chris Thacker
    Currently Head of Engineering at MoneySuperMarket
    @christhacker66
    Mohamed Mulla
    I've been in the testing field for 15 years, working with teams to help deliver great quality software. Always on a continual journey to refine and improve.
    @fosterDoubt

    Registration

    Pro Membership is required to register for TestBash Manchester Online 2020.

    TestBash online events are now part of Pro membership, making it really simple and affordable to attend all our online events. Sign Up now for £24.99 a month or save with our yearly/team subscriptions.

    Go Pro