Ministry of Testing has partnered with Huib Schoots again to make sure that on Friday 16th October, there are plenty of learning opportunities for everyone in this new Online format. How cool is that?

Training

We’re opening the week with the very popular 3-day training course: Automation in Testing with Richard Bradshaw and Mark Winteringham. Places are limited so get that request into your boss as soon as you can and head over to this page to know more details and book your place now.

Workshops

We follow that with 5 world-class full-day workshops in a diverse mix of topics - will one of them fit your appetite for learning? Tickets are limited to 25 attendees per workshop, get yours now so you don't miss out! Workshop ticket prices start at €400 for the Super Early Birds amongst you. Get in quick as some Super Early Bird Tickets are already sold out!

Single-Track Conference

We conclude the week with our beloved single-track conference day, TestBash, where we’ll have 10 fantastic talks covering several different topics and our Community Space for added learning opportunities in the breaks. Plus some great surprises reserved for you!

How to Attend

TestBash Netherlands Online 2020 is free for Pro Members to attend and is very easy to register! Make sure you are logged in with your Pro account and just hit the button Register below.

Not a Pro Member? Sign Up now for £24.99 a month or save up on 2 months with the yearly subscription for £249.99 and register for TestBash Netherlands Online 2020.

If going Pro is not possible at the moment, you can also purchase a single ticket here.

Credit?

Do you have credit with Ministry of Testing and would like to use it to purchase your Pro Membership to attend TestBash Netherlands? Get in touch with us on netherlands@ministryoftesting.com with your previous booking details and we'll make it happen.

Schedule

Friday, 16th of October

09:15 AM
Learning through Exploration - Alexandra Schladebeck & Zeb Ford-Reitz
09:45 AM
The Power of Mocking APIs - Shivani Gaba
10:15 AM
Tester's Guide to Managing Biases - Lina Zubyte
11:30 AM
A Lean Approach to Sharing the Testing - Ali Hill
12:00 PM
Voice Is a New Frontier! - Testing next Generation Interfaces - Lucian Adrian Stroie
12:30 PM
Unmasking Security: Seeing Through the Eyes of an Attacker - Saskia Coplans
02:00 PM
Test Automation as a Service Team - Jarsto van Santen & Jurian Jilderda
02:30 PM
Embracing Leadership: My Journey to Stop Fearing by Start Leading - Pedro Gonzalez
03:00 PM
Resilience Testing! Why Should You? - Geoffrey van der Tas
04:15 PM
Gold Is in Your Trash Can - How to Maximize Feedback’s Value from Testing - Alexandre Bauduin
05:00 PM
99-Second talks
*The presented times are in Netherlands Timezone (UTC+2)

Registration

Pro Membership is required to register for TestBash Netherlands Online 2020 - Conference Day.

TestBash online events are now part of Pro membership, making it really simple and affordable to attend all our online events. Sign Up now for £24.99 a month or save with our yearly/team subscriptions.

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Speakers

Alex Schladebeck

Alex Schladebeck

Head of Quality / CEO

Zeb Ford-Reitz

Zeb Ford-Reitz

Technical Lead

Shivani Gaba

Shivani Gaba

Senior QA

Lina Zubyte

Lina Zubyte

QA Consultant

Ali Hill

Ali Hill

QA and Continuous Delivery Consultant

Lucian Adrian Stroie

Lucian Adrian Stroie

Technology Lead

Saskia Coplans

Saskia Coplans

Founder and Security Consultant

Jurian Jilderda

Jurian Jilderda

Test Automation Engineer

Jarsto van Santen

Jarsto van Santen

Test Automation Engineer

Pedro Gonzalez

Pedro Gonzalez

Technical leader

Geoffrey van der Tas

Geoffrey van der Tas

Quality/Team Performance Coach

Bauduin  Alexandre

Bauduin Alexandre

Senior tester, Airline pilot, inventor...Make it work!

Is your company looking to raise awareness of your testing products or services? Or perhaps they are currently hiring? If so, checkout our sponsorship options to see how TestBash Netherlands Online 2020 - Conference Day could help you.
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Sessions

Exploratory testing remains misunderstood and underappreciated by many in the testing and development communities. For example:

  • Many people know the name but can't say what it means (beyond standard definitions)
  • There are relatively few people who choose to make it their speciality
  • Requests for test services are usually for manual or automated test case creation/execution- even when the project will not benefit from them.
  • Many developers don't understand the value and necessity of it and therefore don't practice and improve.

This is a worrying and also interesting state of affairs. Worrying because exploratory testing is a key part of good quality strategies - and the only way to identify unknown risks. It's interesting because everything we do in software development is exploratory: we work iteratively/incrementally in agile because we gain new insights while working. It's remarkable that we don't already have a catalogue of exploratory activities within software development, and talk more about how to improve our exploration in general.

In this talk, Zeb (a developer) and Alex (a tester) will seek to change this. We will look at exploration as a human activity that has links to agility and experimenting. We'll talk about exploratory activities in the development process - including requirements gathering, coding and debugging, testing (at various layers) and even monitoring and observing. Through stories and examples, we’ll look at exploring from various angles, and give participants motivation and techniques to improve exploration (testing and other activities) within their teams.

Takeaways

  • A better understanding of what exploration is and what activities are exploratory
  • Tips for explaining exploration to others - especially those who don’t “get it” yet
  • How exploration skills will be necessary in the future and how we can prepare ourselves
Alex Schladebeck
Alex is a passionate tester whose favourite topics are quality, agility and humans. She is CEO and Head of Quality at Bredex GmbH. In these roles, she supports colleagues, customers and teams on their journey to better quality - be it in products, in processes or in their communication. In previous roles, she was responsible for enabling teams and growing quality. Now she enables others to do that work, and works on nurturing a system in the company where everyone can flourish. Alex views the world through the curious eyes of a tester and loves learning new things. She shares her knowledge and experience in workshops, coaching sessions and as a speaker or keynote speaker at conferences.
@alex_schl
http://www.schladebeck.de/
Zeb Ford-Reitz
Zeb is a software developer and technical lead at BREDEX GmbH in Germany. He is a huge fan of open source, and was an active Eclipse committer for many years. He works closely with testers in his teams to share understanding about quality and risk. He has a knack for effective code documentation and is not fond of acronyms.
@zfordreitz
Blocked because the API you depend on doesn’t exist yet or isn't completely ready? Facing trouble to test certain scenarios due to a lack of control over third-party APIs?
Struggling to test failure cases like invalid responses or 5XX errors? Frustrated by flaky tests due to slow API responses? 
 
These are some common problems we regularly encounter. We cannot rely on slow APIs that provide a very narrow range of responses. So how can we test effectively in such situations? Is there any feasible solution available? Fortunately, there is: API mocking. 
 
If you are less familiar with mocks and want to gain more insight, join this talk.
In this session, I will explain how to mock APIs using Wiremock. Using a real-life example application, we’ll explore how to handle complex scenarios and form an effective testing strategy. Join this session to gain insights on how, when, and—most importantly—why we should mock APIs. Together we will discover how development and testing can benefit from mocks.  Remember, “If API testing is the king, mocking APIs is the queen!”
 
Please note: at the end of this talk, all attendees will have full access to the example application used during the talk for trying out mocking for themselves :) 
 

Takeaways

 
  • The benefits of mocking APIs for development and testing
  • How to mock APIs
  • Which scenarios can be covered better with mocks
  • When to mock and when not to mock
  • Which different types of testing benefit from mocks
Shivani Gaba
Shivani is a passionate QA Engineer who believes that knowledge sharing boost up all engaged parties and increases their confidence. It was summer of 2013 when Shivani and “testing” met each other first time and are best friends since then. Holding rich experience in testing domain, she currently works as Senior QA Engineer with XING (the largest business network in German speaking countries). With hands-on in all layers of software testing ranging from UI(frontend), API and backend, functional, non-functional , mobile testing - API remains her all-time favourite. As a certified scrum master, working in agile manner is always her approach. She believes in idea of spreading her findings about any “new fancy stuff” she learns. She has worked with multiple international teams and brings forward idea of whole team contributing for quality. She's always up for conversation over twitter, email, linkedin, Xing or beer table :) Linkedin Xing
@shivani_gaba_
Biases are systematic thinking errors that we tend to make. It is inherent to our jobs as testers that we have to collaborate with very diverse groups of people. Some of them may be biased against you - we all know the stereotype of the tester as the nosy intruder who comes to point out everyone's mistakes. But have you ever turned the mirror towards yourself and considered that YOU may be biased as well? Your testing processes may be affected by biases. And even technology itself sometimes inherits their creators' biases.
 
After having worked in both a big multinational company and its opposite - a tiny start-up in various countries, I realized that the most rewarding progress I've made as a tester was recognizing that I have my own biases, and then learning how to manage them. As a result, I have been able to collaborate with my co-workers more effectively, setting aside my own predispositions and allowing myself to take a step back and look at things more objectively, thus ensuring the quality of our products. I realized that all of our work is affected by biases - be it directly or indirectly. This has led me to a lot of great books, conversations, and discoveries about biases.
 
In this story-fuelled session, I will share practical tips on how to recognize your biases, deal with all kinds of professionals and make sure that your testing and the technology you are testing is not biased. 

Takeaways

  • Question everything you (and others) do and this will help to recognize biases.
  • Especially nowadays we have to be responsible not to let biases creep into our tech work (like AI).
  • Everyone is biased, but learning how to manage your biases can help you succeed as a tester.
Lina Zubyte
Lina Zubyte is a passionate Quality Enthusiast who loves to ask questions, test, collaborate with diverse departments and investigate issues. Lina has worked in companies of different sizes (large multi-national companies and startups), moved between countries for work and have had to adapt quickly to get out of comfort zone. Favorite parts of being a quality professional for Lina are: diving deep into complex issues which may even reveal design or algorithm flaws, using monitoring tools and analytics data to understand the impact of found issues and collaborating with the team to build a high quality product.
@buggylina
https://qualitybits.tech
As the sole tester on a team that's moving towards continuous delivery and building a DevOps culture, how can your team release frequently, and with confidence?
 
Within my Agile team, the testing activity had become the bottleneck. The testing ‘To Do’ cards on the team’s newly implemented Kanban board were piling up. As the sole test specialist within my team I felt as if I was preventing us from being able to deploy code to our live environment. Frustrated, we got together as a team to discuss how we could fix this problem. 
 
By using our 3Cs board, the team reached a solution. We decided to share my testing knowledge within the team. My role as the test specialist evolved into a coaching role, which made me feel both excited and nervous. We found ways to test throughout the development process. We learned to design test plans and discuss technical challenges together. We collaborated on the testing effort. 
 
In this talk I’m going to share how my team removed the testing bottleneck by using Lean techniques, built in quality to our product and started to become true cross-functional team members by increasing collaboration. I'll also discuss the challenges we faced, such as making this new approach a habit, and how we overcame them. 

If you face similar challenges with your own team, you can try similar experiments.

Takeaways

  • How sharing your testing knowledge can lead to quality being built into your product, thus reducing waste.
  • How to encourage non test specialists to get involved in the testing effort.
  • How collaborating on testing activities built closer relationships across the team.
Ali Hill
Ali began his software testing career testing video games before moving into an Agile testing role. He now works as a QA and Continuous Delivery Consultant at ECS Digital. He has a passion for learning. Recently Ali has been interested in learning how software testing can flourish in the world of DevOps and Continuous Delivery and has been sharing his testing knowledge within his cross-functional team. Ali can be found talking about testing on Twitter, blogging or at the Edinburgh Ministry of Testing Meetup.
@ali_hill91
https://edinburghtester.wordpress.com

The best interface is told to be the one that is seamless to interact with, and a new wave of interfaces based on text, voice or gestures is emerging based on this motto.

At the same time, these interfaces make use of advanced algorithms, ranging from pattern and expression matching engines to natural language processing, sometimes backed by AI algorithms and wrapped around as API services.

Given these starting conditions, testing interfaces based on voice, natural language, gestures or other camera based inputs can raise challenges, from both the novelty as well as from the complexity point of view.

During this session the most important aspects of testing such interfaces will be covered sharing real life experience on putting together the test strategy, tooling, hinting what to do and what to look for, highlighting the importance of modeling intents and transitions in the state-machine model of the tested system.

Takeaways

  • What is a non-conventional / next generation interface?
  • How can I build my testing approach for such an interface?
  • What from my current toolset can I use for this new context?
  • What are aspects to consider when encountering AI in the tester systems?
Lucian Adrian Stroie
The important things are mindsets! They will change you!” is Lucian’s motto. He is currently working at R/GA where he has the opportunity to work with new technologies, brilliant design people and crafty developers, this blend resulting in award-winning & innovative user experiences. His journey into testing started in 2005, and since then he took an interest in many things related to testing & agile His testing experience covers a wide range, from networking & embedded to mobile apps, going through security and desktop applications. His recent interest is in exploring the interaction between users, computer interfaces, and data-driven methods (e.g. AI, ML). You can connect further on Twitter (@lucianadrian) or through his blog (lucianadrians.wordpress.com).
@lucianadrian
https://lucianadrians.wordpress.com/

This is the story of how we helped a client save their security budget. By working with this massive enterprise to embed practical and tangible security solutions across their teams, we drastically reduced their dependency on external forces, reduced vulnerabilities in the pipeline and helped them understand where to target security more efficiently.

In this talk, we'll discuss how security can be integrated into all parts of an organisations culture, with a focus on software testing, by learning how to think like an attacker. How by empowering teams with a hackers mindset we can take the mystery out of security.

Takeaways

  • Understanding how to see through the eyes of an attacker to become more secure
  • How you can champion security across your organisation
  • Why testers are uniquely equipped to carry the torch for security in the pipeline
Saskia Coplans

Saskia is Security Consultant and Director at Digital Interruption. She a registered Data Protection Officer (DPO) and a privacy specialist with over ten years of experience in information security and governance. Along with standards and policy development, she has developed risk-based defensive security strategies across Europe and Central Asia for Governments, NGO’s, Regulators and the Private Sector.

Saskia is a founder of the InfoSec Hoppers, a group of women confronting the gender gap in InfoSec by working together to highlight diversity issues in the industry and make conferences, events and meetups more accessible. She sits on the board or OWASP Manchester and Manchester Grey Hats.

@ms__chief
https://www.digitalinterruption.com/di-blog

In January of 2017 the "Service Team Testautomation" was founded at DUO (part of the Netherlands Ministry of Education). The aim: getting our roughly 40 DevOps teams to properly use automated tests. In the initial mission statement, the main focus was on finding technical solutions. The main line of thinking was: if you build the right stack, the automated tests will come.

As some of you may have guessed: it's never that easy.

Let's look at a few of the problems we ran into:

  • Is ‘built by testers’ actually the right approach?
  • Does 'the right stack' even exist?
  • How do we get people to use the stack we've built, the right way?
  • Can we balance 'can we automate this' and 'should we automate this'?

In the end, we’ve overcome all these issues and managed to turn this experiment into a success, with a major impact on the way testing is done in our DevOps teams.

We’ll discuss the answers we found and the lessons we've learned along the way. Whether you're looking to support others in using automation or looking to automate some tests yourself, hopefully, this talk will save you the trouble of making some of the mistakes we did.

Takeaways

  • How to find/build the right (or good enough) stack
  • Don't stop testing when you start automating
  • Teach what you preach
  • Build support for automation (managers matter)
Jurian Jilderda

Jurian is a test automation engineer at DUO in Groningen, the Netherlands. He's been testing for over 10 years now. Having started out as a manual tester who liked to automate tests, he's now become a test automator: building frameworks & supporting and teaching fellow testers - together with the rest of the Test Automation Service Team.

He lives in Assen, home of the famous Dutch TT race, with his wife and three kids. When he's not at work he can be found coaching his son's football team and supporting his local church. If there's nothing to be done on those either he likes to exercise, run, Netflix, or game his free time away.

Jarsto van Santen

Jarsto has been playing with code for a quarter of a century now, having started at 11 years old. Despite studying law he eventually saw sense and turned his hobby into a career. He now works as a test automation engineer at DUO, as part of the Test Automation Service Team. In practice, this means developing internal testing tools and supporting colleagues when they have trouble getting automated tests to work. As well as a critical look at what should or shouldn't be automated.

In his free time Jarsto is mildly obsessed with world history, science fiction, and fantasy, and all sorts of technology he doesn't get to play around with at work (yet). Somehow he never quite has the time to watch as many movies/series, read as many books, or play as many games as he thinks he should.

@TestTactician
Leading teams is no easy task, you have to deal with people that can have very different personalities, collaborate with them on a daily basis, coordinate activities, be their representative in meetings with stakeholders, and are accountable for the results not only from your work but also from the work your team does.
 
While this is not an impossible task, it can feel exactly like that if you’re an introvert like me, however if you look closely at your own life, you might end up discovering that you can truly be a leader despite feeling you can’t because of your introversion.
 
In this session I’ll share my journey to be able to lead a team, the things I had to go through to get to that point, the lessons I learned, and how reflecting on my own steps was key in helping me achieve this goal.

Takeaways

  • A not so common insight from an introvert about leadership roles.
  • Help attendees identify how they’ve probably been leaders without really noticing.
  • Some tips on how to make your way into leadership roles despite being an introvert.
 
Pedro Gonzalez
I have 11+ years of hands on experience in quality engineering roles. I’ve worked mostly on consulting roles during my career, but also have experience with product development environments and have had a chance to lead teams multiple times in my career.
@pgonzalezr
Nowadays we build applications via the microservice principles to make our applications easier to maintain, deploy, test and change. These microservices can easily be deployed on cloud platforms. Within the cloud we select the best architecture components and all our problems disappear. We automate every step and are able to recover and re-deploy within minutes. Sounds good! Never have performance, resilience or any infrastructure issues ever again. 
 
However, in the cloud more responsibilities end up with the DevOps teams. They become responsible for the infrastructure, have more settings to tune and variables you can control. This also impacts testing.  
 
During this talk we will explore this new world, the impact on testing and how resilience testing fits in. Based on the experience and failures I had with teams moving to the cloud, I will tell you about the pitfalls and how to avoid them. I will also show you how to start with resilience testing your own microservice/cloud infrastructure. 

Takeaways

  • Resilience testing, why it is important and how to start with it! 
  • Theory on Cloud, Microservices 
  • How to do your very own Resilience Test
  • The importance of Monitoring and combination with testers
  • Tools & Best practices to start resilience testing.
  • Geoffrey van der Tas
    Geoffrey works as though leader for Ordina Auto|Q. Geoffrey has focus on more the agile side of testing and exploratory side of testing. Together Geoffrey and Mark worked on this workshop to combine both their skill sets.
    @gavdtas
    https://Geoffreyvdtas.com
    With new development techniques, a couple of things have changed in the testing world. Most of the time the so-called “QA department” went dead when seeking more efficiency and trying to cut costs. A new breed of tester was born: The embedded testers. We want to have quicker feedback on the product, testers have to work hand to hand with the developers, test immediately when code is produced.

    Before the AGILE transformation, testers were like AWACS, planes fitted with a big radar, capable of seeing far away, at the verge of the horizon, relaying crucial tactical information to command center. QA was mandated to perform reviews, inspections and testing on the whole project. 

    When we are testing, regardless of techniques or tools, we are learning and observing what is going on with the product. We report defects based on requirements and good engineering judgment. Writing defects in a bug tracking is one thing, but in fact, testers are located at an ideal spot watching the project taking off. 

    The software industry does not pay as much attention to waste as much as other industries that are deep into lean manufacturing. In aviation, all issues are scrutinized and taken very seriously even if they are (just) incidents.

    What can we derive from issues or bugs (we call them “snags“ in aviation) so that the same problem never will occur again? Why do we have to report the same issues about a login screen over and over? Fixing an issue is important for the product but understanding how that issue made its way inside the product is a great value for the company. Not only we can fix the issue but we can improve processes and more. Not only we become better at building the product but we get better at building any product. 

    In this talk, I will expose my experience as a test strategy lead in the flight simulation world and of course savings that have been achieved by bringing into software lean manufacturing concepts like Kaizen. Flight simulation is a mix of software and serious hardware where we have to deal with a 643 pages long test requirement document from aviation authorities. We will go over the land of dashboards, retrospectives, requirements and of course testing and all that with concrete problems I have bumped in many times. 

    Takeaways

    • Stop fixing issues. Understand why they are there to improve your business.
    • Recognize patterns: A key indicator that some issues are likely to occur and spread.
    • Testing without coding: Testing starts when the proposal is built.
    Bauduin Alexandre
    Alexandre Bauduin is a 53 year old world traveler. He worked in consulting firms gaining experience in several fields (medical, manufacturing, aerospace, pay TV, data warehouse—to name a few) in different countries (Switzerland, France, Spain, Canada, etc.) His career started in the space industry where he discovered his passion for aerospace, working on both military and civilian projects. He was sometimes steered away from aerospace but his passion pushed him to become an airline pilot, as a way to really understand how those instruments he programmed and integrated were operating in a cockpit. One of his last challenges was to organize flight simulator testing into a lean manufacturing environment. He works with milling machines, draftsmanship, accounting and finance, software development, electronic design and industrial robots, and it is always fun for him to use an oscilloscope, an ARINC bus analyzer, and step into assembly language or stall a Boeing 777!
    @B777Alex
    https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexandre-bauduin/

    Registration

    Pro Membership is required to register for TestBash Netherlands Online 2020 - Conference Day.

    TestBash online events are now part of Pro membership, making it really simple and affordable to attend all our online events. Sign Up now for £24.99 a month or save with our yearly/team subscriptions.

    Go Pro